Origins

John Jenkins and Herbert W. Whitney founded the Student Conference On National Affairs in 1955 by with the opening of Texas A&M's Memorial Student Center. Their mentor and advisor, J.W. Stark threw the two Corps of Cadets members and the original SCONA team into traveling for office visits and mailing out invitations for universities around the nation. The first SCONA conference hosted seven speakers, including the Assistant Secretary of State, George C. McGhee. The Memorial Student Center and SCONA provided Aggies with a chance to bond over an incredible national affairs conference. For over 60 years, students from across the nation and the world travel to Aggieland to represent unique voices and perspectives.


 



The 60th Student Conference On National Affairs

The 60th Student Conference on National Affairs topic is “Surviving Ourselves: Ignite the Human Potential”. Our focus will be on the intersection of America’s political institutions and the nation’s most productive capital, the American workforce. Appropriately valuing America’s human capital is the source of constant policy debate. In order to develop innovative solutions to this complex facet of governance, the topic will survey and address the foreign and domestic approaches to the valuation of human capital.

Preparation for SCONA 60 is in the works so check back here as we update the website with speakers, subtopic choices, and more!

“The rights of every man are diminished when the rights of one man are threatened.”- John F. Kennedy


THE SCONA COMMITTEE

HOWDY AGS!
If you are interested in current issues, politics, logistics, marketing, United States' policy (or how its written), working with our public figures, technology, leadership or the spread of ideas, consider applying to be a member of the SCONA Committee. Committee members are the ones forming and growing the conference from Day 1 of planning to the closing banquet. As a student lead and run organization, committee members build the conference and its shaped by you, the student.